Previously published on May 8

Based on my previous experience of her playing, a Beethoven Third Piano Concerto with the Hallé and Mark Elder, together with this Childhood-centric release, it may be that Isata turns out to be the most talented, certainly the most communicative, of the Kanneh-Mason clan. Her opening Mozart, K265, Variations on a twinkling tune, sparkles spontaneously, and the same starry number feeds Ernö Dohnányi’s Variations on a Nursery Song, an inventive and witty work that the composer recorded in the late-fifties with Boult, https://www.discogs.com/master/982342-Ernst-von-Dohn%C3%A1nyiRoyal-Philharmonic-Orchestra-Sir-Adrian-Boult-Variations-On-A-Nursery-TunePiano-C?image=15890615.SW1hZ2U6NDg2NjM4MzM%3D, and which I got to know from Béla Siki’s Vox/Turnabout version, https://www.discogs.com/master/1417863-Dohnanyi-Seattle-Symphony-Orchestra-Milton-Katims-Bela-Siki-Variations-On-A-Nursery-Song-For-Piano-A/image/SW1hZ2U6MTIxMjkwMTM=. It’s hugely enjoyable music that opens dramatically, almost operatically, before settling into an ingenious sequence of colourful and contrasting commentaries that Isata, the Liverpool Philharmonic and Domingo Hindoyan, make a marvellous job of. Philip Siney’s recorded sound, November-December last year, is first-class, both Liverpool, either the Philharmonic Hall or, solo pieces, The Friary. Isata also includes Debussy’s Children’s Corner and Schumann’s Kinderszenen; both are finely done, considered yet fresh, innate, whether cake-walking or dreaming, to complete a winning release. Decca 485 4180 is released on May 26.

https://shop.houseofmusic.decca.com///Childhood-Tales-CD/7RZ10000000